Books by Sharon T. Jones

Filled with helpful examples and real-life projects of SAS users, A Recipe for Success Using SAS University Edition is an easy guide on how to start applying the analytical power of SAS to real-world scenarios.
This book shows you:

  • how to start using analytics
  • how to use SAS to accomplish a project goal
  • how to effectively apply SAS to your community or school
  • how users like you implemented SAS to solve their analytical problems

A beginner’s guide on how to create and complete your first analytics project using SAS University Edition, this book is broken down into easy-to-read chapters that also include quick takeaway tips. It introduces you to the vocabulary and structure of the SAS language, shows you how to plan and execute a successful project, introduces you to basic statistics, and it walks you through case studies to inspire and motivate you to complete your own projects.

Following a recipe for success using this book, harness the power of SAS to plan and complete your first analytics project!

Recommending Reading

“Hello Ruby is half picture book and half activity book rolled into one adorable package. It introduces programming without requiring a computer at all. The point of the book isn’t to teach you a programming language, but programming concepts.” –GeekMom.com

Meet Ruby―a small girl with a huge imagination, and the determination to solve any puzzle. As Ruby stomps around her world making new friends, including the Wise Snow Leopard, the Friendly Foxes, and the Messy Robots, kids will be introduced to the fundamentals of computational thinking, like how to break big problems into small ones, create step-by-step plans, look for patterns and think outside the box through storytelling. Then, these basic concepts at the core of coding and programming will be reinforced through fun playful exercises and activities that encourage exploration and creativity.

In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it.

Did you know that Bill Gates, cofounder of Microsoft, wrote his first computer program—a tic-tac-toe game—at age 13? Coding Games in Scratch shows how kids can start coding their own games, too, using Scratch, a popular free programming language.

With Coding Games in Scratch, kids can build single and multiplayer platform games, create puzzles and memory games, race through mazes, add animation, and more. All they need is a desktop or laptop with Adobe 10.2 or later, and an internet connection to download Scratch 2.0. Coding can be done without download on https://scratch.mit.edu.

Essential coding concepts are explained using eight build-along game projects that guide young coders step-by-step, using visual samples, easy-to-follow instructions, and fun pixel art.

Written for children ages 8–12 with little to no coding experience, Coding Games in Scratchteaches important strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas, all while creating games to play with their friends.

Supporting STEM education initiatives, computer coding teaches kids how to think creatively, work collaboratively, and reason systematically, and is quickly becoming a necessary and sought-after skill. DK’s computer coding books are full of fun exercises with step-by-step guidance, making them the perfect introductory tools for building vital skills in computer programming.

Get kids building exciting computer projects, such as animations, games, and mini-movies, with DK Workbooks: Coding in Scratch: Projects Workbook. Perfect for children ages 6–9 who are new to coding, this highly visual workbook is a fun introduction to Scratch, a free computer coding programming language.

With easy-to-follow directions and fun pixel art, DK Workbooks: Coding in Scratch: Projects Workbook helps kids understand the basics of programming and how to create cool projects in Scratch through fun, hands-on learning experiences. All they need is a desktop or laptop with Adobe 10.2 or later, and an internet connection to download Scratch 2.0. Coding can be done without download on https://scratch.mit.edu.

Kids can light up the night sky with their own colorful messages and drawings or make their own music and become the ultimate DJ. They can create a digital portrait of a pet and customize the pictures with sounds and animations, or test their knowledge with a times tables quiz. This workbook is filled with open-ended projects that use art, music, sound effects, and math and can be shared online with friends. Kids can even test their coding knowledge with written vocabulary and programming quizzes at the end of each project.

Supporting STEM education initiatives, computer coding teaches kids how to think creatively, work collaboratively, and reason systematically, and is quickly becoming a necessary and sought-after skill. DK’s computer coding books are full of fun exercises with step-by-step guidance, making them the perfect introductory tools for building vital skills in computer programming.

The visual arts are rapidly changing as media moves into the web, mobile devices, and architecture. When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables them to create new media for the present, and to imagine future media that are beyond the capacities of current software tools. This book introduces this new literacy by teaching computer programming within the context of the visual arts. It offers a comprehensive reference and text for Processing (www.processing.org), an open-source programming language that can be used by students, artists, designers, architects, researchers, and anyone who wants to program images, animation, and interactivity. Written by Processing’s cofounders, the book offers a definitive reference for students and professionals. Tutorial chapters make up the bulk of the book; advanced professional projects from such domains as animation, performance, and installation are discussed in interviews with their creators.

This second edition has been thoroughly updated. It is the first book to offer in-depth coverage of Processing 2.0 and 3.0, and all examples have been updated for the new syntax. Every chapter has been revised, and new chapters introduce new ways to work with data and geometry. New “synthesis” chapters offer discussion and worked examples of such topics as sketching with code, modularity, and algorithms. New interviews have been added that cover a wider range of projects. “Extension” chapters are now offered online so they can be updated to keep pace with technological developments in such fields as computer vision and electronics.

InterviewsSUE.C, Larry Cuba, Mark Hansen, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Jürg Lehni, LettError, Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman, Benjamin Maus, Manfred Mohr, Ash Nehru, Josh On, Bob Sabiston, Jennifer Steinkamp, Jared Tarbell, Steph Thirion, Robert Winter

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